National Bank’s line of travel credit cards doesn’t seem to get much recognition.

Maybe it’s because of the bank’s smaller footprint, or because their annual rewards on a typical spend are not spectacular…

But if you take a closer look, you’ll find a remarkable line of insurance features combined with unique perks that aren’t found on any other card.

While the earning potential with these cards may leave something to be desired, what’s important to you (aka the sliders) makes a big difference as to whether these cards are a good match for you or not. So let’s review:

National Bank’s à la carte travel rewards

National Bank travel credit cards earn National Bank’s own rewards points.

These points can be redeemed for:

  • travel through National Bank’s à la carte travel rewards,
  • travel booked through another place of your choosing, or…
  • merchandise and gift cards through National Bank’s site.

Keep in mind: Using National Bank’s site to redeem for travel purchases offers the best value, but only flights and vacation packages are eligible for point redemption:

10,000 points = $100

…and that value is what will be used to evaluate the cards rewards earnings.

Plus a $150 travel bonus.
Only 200 gift cards left.

National Bank World Elite Mastercard

National Bank’s premium offering – the World Elite Mastercard – might not have the greatest return on spending, but it has some unique perks not easily found on other cards.

To start, this card allows you to earn:

  • 1.5 points per dollar on the first $40,000 annual spend,
  • 2 points per dollar for annual spend between $40,000 and $80,000, and then…
  • 1.5 points per dollar after $80,000.

As a World Elite Mastercard ‒ there is an annual fee of $150 and you will need either a personal income of $80,000 or a household income of $150,000. However, until December 31, when you spend $3,000 in 3 months, you’ll get a rebate on the annual fee.

However, if you don’t meet those steep income requirements, spending $25,000 per year on your existing National Bank credit card first should also qualify you for this card.

With points being worth a maximum of 1 cent each, unless you’re a very high spender, there are cards out there that will give you a better return on your spending, but…

This card does offer specific benefits that bring real value to the table…so keep reading.

Complimentary travel benefits

The National Bank World Elite Mastercard has two major travel benefits that come at no extra cost to you.

1. Travel fee reimbursement

Tired of paying for airport parking and baggage fees?

Every year, National Bank will reimburse you up to $250 for the following travel fees that you may incur:

  • seat selection (up to $50),
  • airport parking (up to $100), and
  • baggage fees (up to $100).

Simply charge these items to your card, keep your receipts, and send in a reimbursement claim for these expenses.

It’s a great way to save $250 a year on basic travel expenses, and more than offset the annual fee.

With this taken into account, let’s see what the total overall return is based on using the entire $250 travel reimbursement and our typical $2,000 month spend:

Spend: $24,000 spent x 1.5 points x $ 0.01 value = $360

Travel Fee: $250

Annual Fee: ($150)

Total Return: $460

$460 annually is a decent overall return and would push this card in the top 10 when looking at our base $2,000 monthly spend. This benefit alone makes it a competitive option.

But the National Bank World Elite Mastercard doesn’t stop there…

2. Airport Lounge Access

Travel frequently through Montreal-Trudeau Airport?

National Bank operates their own airport lounge near gate 53 at the Montreal-Trudeau airport that your World Elite card gives you exclusive access to.

Simply show your credit card and boarding pass to gain entry.

Keep in mind: The lounge is not available for passengers travelling to the United States.

Insurance Coverages

This is where this card really starts to stand out.

The insurance package offered here is among the best you can find.

Insurance Coverage Additional Details
Extended Warranty 2 years (triples manufacturer warranty)
Purchase Protection 180 days
Emergency Medical 60 days (for age 54 and under)
31 days (for age 55 to 64)
15 days (for age 65 to 74)
Trip Cancellation $2,500
Trip Interruption $5,000
Flight Delay $500
Baggage Delay $500
Lost or Stolen Baggage $1,000
Rental Car Theft & Damage Yes
Rental Car Personal Effects $2,000

The extended warranty offered here is incredibly rare. Most credit cards will only double the warranty up to an additional year ‒ but here we get triple the length up to 2 years.

The same goes for the purchase protection, most credit cards only offer 90 days, but here we get 180.

The travel insurances that are included are also hard to beat.

Let’s compare what is offered to another popular travel card – the – which carries an annual fee of $120 and income requirements of either $60,000 personal or $100,000 household.

Insurance Coverage Additional Details
Extended Warranty 1 year
Purchase Protection 90 days
Emergency Medical 21 days (age 64 and under)
4 days (age 65 and up)
Travel Accident $500,000
Trip Cancellation $1,500
Trip Interruption $5,000
Flight Delay $500
Baggage Delay $1,000
Lost or Stolen Baggage $1,000
Rental Car Theft & Damage Yes

While this insurance package is good, it’s not as good as the above National Bank card. Especially if you are looking for quality medical and purchase insurance because National Bank offers a far greater dollar value for a much longer period.

In fact, National bank is one of the few credit cards that offer coverage for people over 65 for 15 days.

Keep in mind: The National Bank World Elite Mastercard does not include travel accident (common carrier) insurance.

If you don’t qualify for World Elite Cards, don’t worry, there are two other cards to consider…

National Bank World Mastercard

National Bank’s World Mastercard is very similar to the World Elite and allows you to earn:

  • 1.25 points per dollar on the first $20,000 annual spend,
  • 2 points per dollar for annual spend between $20,000 and $30,000, and then…
  • 1.25 points per dollar after $30,000.

This card has an annual fee of $115 and an income requirement that is the same as a typical World Mastercard ‒ $60,000 personal or $100,000 household. However, spending a minimum of $15,000 in a year on an existing National Bank card should also get you this one.

Similar to the World Elite, this World version doesn’t have the best earn rate. The first $20,000 in annual spend is easily matched by some no annual fee cash back cards.

But, if you spend $30,000 or more a year, you will start to see some value in points. (Although, if you’re spending that much, probably better to upgrade to the World Elite Version.)

Unfortunately, this card does not offer the complimentary travel benefits that the World Elite Mastercard comes with to make up for its lower return on spending.

It does have the exact same insurance package.

So, if you don’t meet the income requirements of the World Elite card, but the insurance package is what you’re after, then this card could be an option.

National Bank Platinum Mastercard

Unlike the above two cards, the has no income requirement.

With an annual fee of $89, this card you will give you 1 point for every dollar spent.

Similar to the other two cards, the overall earn rate on your spend is not great – a 1% return is easily found among many no-annual fee cards.

And although the insurance package isn’t quite as good as its World and World Elite counterparts, it still compares favourably to the competition.

Insurance Coverage Additional Details
Extended Warranty 2 years (triples manufacturer warranty)
Purchase Protection 180 days
Emergency Medical 10 days (under age 74)
Trip Cancellation $1,500
Trip Interruption $2,500
Flight Delay $500
Baggage Delay $500
Lost or Stolen Baggage $1,000
Rental Car Theft & Damage Yes

Not as impressive as the World and World Elite, but it still offers the same extended warranty and purchase protection.

So, if a good insurance package and no income requirement are important to you, then this card could fit the bill.

What’s important to you?

When looking at these cards on the surface, their earning rates are average at best. However, their perks and insurance packages are some of the best and hard to ignore.

So, are these cards worth it?

It all depends on what’s important to you – if perks and an impressive insurance package matter MOST to you, then yes, these cards should be given some serious consideration.